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ApolloSage Hospitals KIDNEY STONES NEPHROLITHIASIS SYMPTOMS CAUSES TYPES DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

KIDNEY STONES NEPHROLITHIASIS SYMPTOMS CAUSES TYPES DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

Kidney Stones (Nephrolithiasis) - Symptoms, Causes, Types, Diagnosis & Treatment

Kidney Stones (Nephrolithiasis) - Symptoms, Causes, Types, Diagnosis & Treatment

What is a Kidney Stone or Nephrolithiasis?


Kidney stones, also known as nephrolithiasis, are hard deposits that form in the kidneys when substances in the urine become highly concentrated. These substances can include calcium, oxalate, uric acid, and others. Kidney stones exhibit a wide range of sizes, spanning from minuscule grains of sand to substantial golf ball-sized formations.
When these substances become concentrated enough, they can crystallize and form solid masses within the kidney. These masses can remain in the kidney or travel down the urinary tract, causing pain and other symptoms.

Kidney Stones Disease Symptoms


Here are the symptoms of kidney stones in detail:

  • Severe Pain: The hallmark symptom of kidney stones is intense pain, often described as one of the most severe pains one can experience. The pain typically begins suddenly and may come and go in waves. It commonly starts in the back, just below the ribs, and can radiate to the lower abdomen, groin, or genital area. The pain may be sharp, cramping, or throbbing and can be debilitating. It may be so severe that it causes nausea, vomiting, restlessness, and an inability to find a comfortable position.
  • Painful Urination: Some people with kidney stones may experience pain or a burning sensation when urinating. This discomfort is often felt as the stone moves through the urinary tract, irritating the lining of the ureter or bladder.
  • Blood in the Urine (Hematuria): Kidney stones can cause blood to appear in the urine, either visible to the naked eye (gross hematuria) or detected through microscopic analysis. The color of the urine can range from pink to red or even brownish.Hematuria can occur when the sharp edges of a stone scrape against the lining of the urinary tract, causing small blood vessels to bleed.
  • Frequent Urination: People with kidney stones may feel the need to urinate more frequently than usual, often passing only small amounts of urine at a time. This frequent urge to urinate can be a result of irritation or obstruction caused by the stone.
  • Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): Kidney stones can increase the risk of urinary tract infections, which may cause symptoms such as fever, chills, and pain or burning during urination. UTIs can occur when bacteria become trapped behind a stone and multiply in the urinary tract.
  • Cloudy or Foul-Smelling Urine: In addition to blood, urine passed with kidney stones may appear cloudy or have an unusual odor. This may be a sign of infection or the presence of other substances in the urine.

These symptoms can vary depending on the size, location, and composition of the kidney stone. Not everyone with kidney stones will experience all of these symptoms, and some people may have stones without any noticeable symptoms.

Causes of Kidney Stones Disease

Kidney stones form when certain substances in the urine become highly concentrated and crystallize, forming solid masses within the kidneys. The exact cause of kidney stones can vary depending on factors such as the type of stone and individual risk factors.

Here are the main causes and risk factors associated with kidney stone disease:

  • Dehydration: Insufficient fluid intake can lead to concentrated urine, which increases the risk of stone formation. Not drinking enough water reduces the volume of urine produced by the kidneys, allowing minerals and other substances to become more concentrated and form crystals that can eventually develop into stones.
  • Dietary Factors:

High Intake of Certain Foods: Consuming foods high in oxalate, such as spinach, rhubarb, nuts, and chocolate, can increase the risk of calcium oxalate stones. Similarly, a diet high in sodium (salt) can lead to higher levels of calcium in the urine, increasing the risk of calcium-based stones.
High Protein Diet: Diets high in animal protein (e.g., meat, poultry, fish) can increase the risk of uric acid and calcium oxalate stones.
Low Calcium Diet: Contrary to popular belief, reducing dietary calcium intake may increase the risk of calcium oxalate stones. Calcium helps bind oxalate in the intestines, preventing it from being absorbed into the bloodstream and excreting it through the urine. Therefore, low calcium intake can lead to higher levels of oxalate in the urine, increasing the risk of stone formation.
Family or Personal History: A family history of kidney stones increases the likelihood of developing them. Additionally, individuals with a personal history of kidney stones are at higher risk of recurrence.

  • Medical Conditions:

Hypercalciuria: Excessive calcium excretion in the urine (hypercalciuria) can increase the risk of calcium-based kidney stones.
Hyperoxaluria: High levels of oxalate in the urine (hyperoxaluria) can lead to calcium oxalate stones.
Hyperuricosuria: High levels of uric acid in the urine (hyperuricosuria) can increase the risk of uric acid stones.
Cystinuria: A unique genetic condition results in the kidneys excreting abnormally high levels of cystine, an amino acid. Consequently, this can result in the development of cystine stones.
Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA): A condition characterized by impaired acid-base balance in the kidneys, leading to the formation of calcium phosphate stones.

  • Certain Medications: Some medications can increase the risk of kidney stones by altering urinary composition or function. Examples include diuretics (water pills), calcium-based antacids, and certain anti-seizure medications.
  • Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome: Being overweight or obese and having conditions such as high blood pressure, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia (abnormal lipid levels) are associated with an increased risk of kidney stones.
  • Gastrointestinal Surgery or Disorders: Intestinal bypass surgery or other gastrointestinal disorders that affect the absorption of nutrients can increase the risk of kidney stones by altering the composition of urine.
  • Geographic Location and Climate: Living in hot, dry climates or working in environments with high temperatures and humidity can lead to increased fluid loss through sweating, contributing to dehydration and a higher risk of kidney stone formation.
  • GeographicLocation and Climate: Living in hot, dry climates or working in environments with high temperatures and humidity can lead to increased fluid loss through sweating, contributing to dehydration and a higher risk of kidney stone formation.

Types of Kidney Stones Disease


Kidney stones can form from various substances in the urine, resulting in different types of stones. The main types of kidney stones include:

Calcium Stones:

  • Calcium Oxalate Stones:The most prevalent form of kidney stones are these.They form when oxalate, a compound found in many foods, binds with calcium in the urine to form crystals. Factors such as high oxalate intake, low fluid intake, and certain medical conditions can increase the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation.
  • Calcium Phosphate Stones: These stones are less common and typically occur in people with conditions such as hyperparathyroidism or renal tubular acidosis, which affect calcium metabolism and urinary pH levels.

Uric Acid Stones:

Uric acid stones form when there is an excess of uric acid in the urine, leading to the formation of crystals. Factors such as a high-purine diet (found in certain meats and seafood), gout, metabolic syndrome, and certain medications can increase the risk of uric acid stone formation.


Struvite Stones:


Struvite stones, also known as infection stones, form in the presence of urinary tract infections caused by certain bacteria. These stones have the ability to grow quickly and reach a substantial size. They often consist of magnesium ammonium phosphate and are associated with urinary tract infections caused by urease-producing bacteria, such as Proteus, Klebsiella, and Staphylococcus.


Cystine Stones:


Cystine stones are rare and occur in people with cystinuria, a genetic disorder characterized by impaired reabsorption of cystine in the kidneys. Cystine stones form when there are high levels of cystine in the urine, leading to the formation of crystals.

Other Types:

 

  • Drug-Induced Stones: Certain medications can increase the risk of kidney stone formation by altering urinary composition or function. Examples include diuretics (water pills), calcium-based antacids, and certain anti-seizure medications.
  • Mixed Stones: Sometimes, kidney stones may consist of a combination of different minerals, such as calcium oxalate mixed with calcium phosphate or uric acid.

Diagnosis of Kidney Stones Disease


1.    Medical History and Physical Examination: A healthcare provider will review your medical history and conduct a physical examination to assess symptoms and risk factors for kidney stones.
2.    Imaging Studies:

  • Ultrasound: This non-invasive imaging test uses sound waves to create images of the kidneys and urinary tract. It can help detect the presence of kidney stones, their location, size, and any associated complications.
  • CT Scan: A computed tomography (CT) scan provides detailed cross-sectional images of the kidneys and urinary tract, allowing for accurate diagnosis of kidney stones, evaluation of stone size and location, and detection of complications.

3.    Laboratory Tests:

  • Urinalysis: Analysis of a urine sample can help detect the presence of blood, crystals, and other substances that may indicate the presence of kidney stones or urinary tract infections.
  • Stone Analysis: If a kidney stone is passed or removed, it may be analyzed to determine its composition, which can help guide treatment and preventive measures.

Treatment of Kidney Stones Disease


1.    Pain Management:

  • Pain Medications: Over-the-counter or prescription pain medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or opioids, may be used to relieve severe pain associated with kidney stones.
  • Alpha Blockers: Medications such as tamsulosin may be prescribed to help relax the muscles in the ureter, making it easier for small stones to pass.

2.    Medical Expulsion Therapy:

  • Hydration: Drinking plenty of fluids, especially water, can help flush out kidney stones and prevent their formation. Aim to drink enough fluids to produce at least 2 to 2.5 liters of urine per day.
  • Medications: Certain medications, such as tamsulosin, may be prescribed to help relax the muscles in the ureter, facilitating the passage of small stones.

3.    Minimally Invasive Procedures:

  • Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL): This non-invasive procedure uses shock waves to break up kidney stones into smaller fragments, making them easier to pass through the urinary tract.
  • Ureteroscopy with Laser Lithotripsy: In this procedure, a thin, flexible scope is inserted into the ureter to locate and remove kidney stones. Laser energy is used to break up the stones into smaller pieces for removal.
  • Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL): This surgical procedure involves making a small incision in the back to access the kidney and remove large or complex kidney stones using specialized instruments.

4.    Surgical Intervention:

  • Open Surgery: In rare cases where other treatments are ineffective or not feasible, open surgery may be performed to remove large or complex kidney stones.

5.    Preventive Measures:

  • Dietary Changes: Depending on the type of kidney stone and underlying risk factors, dietary modifications may be recommended to help prevent stone formation. This may include reducing intake of certain foods high in oxalate, sodium, or purines.
  • Lifestyle Modifications: Drinking plenty of fluids, maintaining a healthy weight, and avoiding dehydration can help reduce the risk of kidney stone recurrence.
  • Medications: Depending on the underlying cause of kidney stones, medications may be prescribed to prevent stone formation or recurrence. This may include medications to reduce urinary calcium excretion, control uric acid levels, or alter urine pH.

Best Kidney Stones Treatment in india


Dr.Chaitanya Subhash Kulkarni is currently employed as a nephrologist at Apollo SAGE Hospital in Bhopal. With a total of 8 years of experience in this specialized field, he has established himself as a knowledgeable and skilled practitioner. 
Dr. Kulkarni obtained his MBBS degree from Govt. Medical College, Nagpur in 2008, followed by an MD in medicine from Gandhi Medical College in 2014. In 2019, he successfully completed his DRNB Nephrology from PD Hinduja National Hospital, Mumbai. 
Notably, Dr. Kulkarni has received recognition for his contributions in the field, including winning the 1st prize for oral presentation at the west zone nephrology Conference in Pune and the 1st prize for paper presentation at CMC Vellore. He is an esteemed member of the Indian Society of Nephrology and the National Academy of Medical Science, New Delhi.

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